Wait ‘til Next Year

Posted in Weekly Newsletter on by .

bluegavelThis isn’t about the Chicago Cubs, it’s about the U.S. Supreme Court.

As we’ve noted in recent weeks, precious little good news came out of the recently completed term.

This isn’t about the Chicago Cubs, it’s about the U.S. Supreme Court.

As we’ve noted in recent weeks, precious little good news came out of the recently completed term.

But you take your good news where you can find it, and in its closing days the Court agreed to hear a case with truly great potential benefit for taxpayers and personal liberty—in the next term.

The Court will hear arguments in a California case that will determine whether the Constitution permits mandatory collection of so-called “fair share” union dues from workers who decline union membership.

If you want to know how important this is, how strong the upside is for taxpayers, your best clue is the grim reaction of the left-wingers at Slate.

From where we sit, the most telling statement in the Slate item is the following:  “Stripped of the ability to collect mandatory fees, many public-sector unions will lose much of their bargaining power. Some will likely collapse.”

We couldn’t have said it better. What’s remarkable is that Slate’s legal expert manages to say in plain English that many of these organizations simply could not exist except by forced payment of tribute from unwilling workers, and he seems to see nothing amiss.

Slate is further upset that the Court’s 2010 decision in Citizens United v. Federal Elections Commission recognized that unions and corporations are equally protected by the First Amendment in their political speech—that is, political spending—but now unions expect to have less money to spend.

Well, yes, and there’s a reason: Officers of private-sector corporations that obtain money by coercion are at considerable risk of jail time, a risk to which union bosses, for now, are not proportionally exposed.  Slate and its government-union friends are of course welcome to press the matter.

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